Secret use for crime-fighting drones

FILE PHOTO: A drone hovers at a viewpoint overlooking the Space Needle and skyline of tech hub Seattle, Washington, U.S. February 11, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Helgren

State-of-the-art drones, also known as “unmanned aerial vehicles” (UAVs), will be used at the discretion of the Royal Police Force of Antigua and Barbuda (RPFAB) to fight crime. This is according to the Deputy Commissioner of the RPFAB, Everton Jeffers.

Yesterday, the first of two drones was donated to the RPFAB by calypsonian the Mighty Leopard, an individual who has a long history of donating to government and non-government organisations in Antigua and Barbuda. The Mighty Leopard was represented by Bobby Reis at the handing over ceremony held at the police `headquarters. Unable to give any details about how the drones would be used to fight crime, the deputy commissioner said, “we will use the drones as we see fit.”

He further said, “We want to use our technology here, and this piece of equipment to help us fight crime.” In the handing over ceremony Reis said, “As technology increases our police force needs to keep up with the times.” It is unknown when the drones will be put into operation.

Drones are used by crime-fighting agencies all over the world for various operations depending on the features of the drone.

Drones that are fitted with thermal sensor features are used for search and rescue operations after disasters, pinpointing the number of unidentified subjects in an area earmarked for a police raid, locating hot-spots from fires that are not obvious to the human eye within buildings, surveillance and border control and identifying indoor locations of green houses where illegal substances are grown.

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