New mega-tsunami threat for A&B

WaveResearchers are warning of a new mega-tsunami threat that could devastate Antigua and Barbuda.

Caribbean 360 reports the researchers say it could also wreak destruction across the rest of the Caribbean and coastlines from Florida right down to Brazil.

The study suggests the mega-tsunami could come following a volcanic eruption in the Canary Islands.

The warning is that the monster wave generated by part of a mountain collapsing into the sea would be the biggest ever recorded.

The experts warn it would be an unstoppable force, travelling at speeds of up to 500 miles per hour.

The massive wall of water would likely make first landfall on the West Saharan coast of Morocco, where the wave could measure as much as 330 feet from trough to crest.

But Dr Simon Day of the Benfield Greig Hazard Research Centre at University College London says the greatest destruction would be expected in the built-up coastal areas of the Caribbean, Florida and Brazil.

He says the tsunami could reach heights of 130 to 164 feet throughout the region and travel several miles inland.

Earlier research by Dr Day had predicted that a future eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano in the Canary Islands was likely to cause the western flank of the mountain to slide into the sea.

Dr Day, working in conjunction with Dr Steven Ward of the University of California, has now produced an updated model that predicts more accurately the size of the tsunami and its impact.

The model predicts that after the landslide the tsunami would travel a distance of almost 155 miles in just 10 minutes and would reach the Caribbean and Florida in eight or nine hours.

The forecast goes on to predict that a wall of water 164 feet high could smash into the coasts of the Caribbean and Florida.

Dr Day says an effective earthquake monitoring system could provide advanced warning of a likely collapse and allow early emergency management organisations a valuable window of time

He says eruptions of the volcano in question occur at intervals of decades to a century or so and there may be a number of eruptions before its collapse.

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