Experts examine the impact of increased technology on our everyday lives

Assistant Director of Education Stacy Mascal Payne (file photo)

Experts in the field of Information Technology, Education and Agriculture were brought together in one forum yesterday to discuss new revolutions in technology and its impact on how we live, work and relate to one another.

The symposium was hosted by officials from the Antigua and Barbuda Bureau of Standards in recognition of World Standards Day 2018, which was celebrated under the theme “International Standards and the Fourth Industrial Revolution”.

The speakers acknowledged that the fourth Industrial Revolution will change, not only what we do, but also who we are. It is also expected to affect our identity and other issues associated with our sense of privacy, notions of ownership, our Continued on page 7

Experts from page 8

consumption patterns, the time we devote to work and leisure and how we develop in our careers.

Solomon Doumith, general manager of the Antigua Computer Technology (ACT) said there are many benefits which can be derived from increased technology, especially in our everyday lives.

He, however, pointed out that it is important for people to be trained and educated about what to expect in order to make the transition seamless.

“Displacement of jobs, loss of high paying human jobs is of concern when new automation is introduced. The workforce needs to be educated on this shift and what it means to them. Many fear that industry 4.0 poses a huge threat to the future of the workplace, however, I disagree,” Doumith said.

He explained that, while the transition will not be easy, if strategically executed, it will lead to a much brighter future.

Assistant Director of Education Stacy Mascal Payne also stressed that educators will also have to re-think how they impart knowledge to school-aged children, in light of the changes in technology.

“The way we teach children we have to undo that and begin to think about differentiated direct instructions. In addition to that, we have to prepare our children to be able to develop an aptitude that would be able to allow them to adjust to the uncertainties of the future,” Mascal Payne said.

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