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By Carlena Knight

A local cardiologist is advising residents with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that stopping taking their medication before or after they get the Covid-19 vaccine is unwise.

Dr Georgette Meade, who also heads the Heart & Stroke Foundation, is recommending that patients with heart disease, diabetes and hypertension, among other ailments, should ensure that they continue taking their specific doses of prescribed medicines.

“These persons, as we know, are high risk. You should ensure that you take your medication, watch what you’re eating and ensure that your diabetes is adequately controlled.

“Your HBA1C, which is a blood test, should be less than seven percent and your fasting sugars should be in the range of 100-120; an average of 110 is reasonable.

“You want to make sure all of your medical illnesses are under control, your blood pressure less than 130 over 80,” she said.

“I have had persons who have stopped their heart failure medications; that is definitely not a wise idea.”

Dr Meade said that after being inoculated, persons who experience any side effects should discuss it with their physician.

Asked if she had seen any reports of heart failure being developed after someone has been vaccinated, Dr Meade said she had not.

“I have not seen or heard any reports of heart failure being developed post-vaccine, but we are all watching very closely,” she said.

In several countries, investigations have been conducted and are still ongoing to ascertain if those instances where people had suffered heart failure and other complications were the result of taking any of the Covid-19 jabs.

Just this week, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that it would be conducting investigations into reports of heart problems occurring in young adults and teenagers who have received the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines.

Thus far, no investigations have revealed that this is indeed the case.